Dock Dogs at On the Waterfront

Kate Nelson of Rockford sent in this picture of her labrador retriever performing a jump an event at Gander Mountain this summer. “My dock dog jumped 16 ft 10 in. at the competition and she’ll be competing at Waterfront this weekend! 12 & 2:30 on Saturday and 12:00 on Sunday. If you’re at OTW, stop by and see these flying canines! And thanks Kate for sending in the great picture! -ERIC

Share

Posted under Uncategorized

This post was written by Eric Sorensen on August 31, 2007

Mad Science at On the Waterfront!

Make plans to be at the Kids Kastle while you’re at On the Waterfront! That is where Eric and I will be performing several of our favorite Mad Science experiments. Eric will be out there Saturday at 1pm and 3pm, and I will be out there Sunday at 1pm and 3pm. We are teaming up with our friends at the Discovery Center Museum. You can witness the infamous “mentos” experiement, play with slime, and see much more. It will definitely be “fun for all ages.” And best of all, it’s totally free!

The Kids Kastle is located in the parking deck on S. Wyman Street in downtown Rockford, just south of Main (across from the Nat’l City Bank building). We’ll see you there! -ADAM

Share

Posted under Uncategorized

This post was written by Eric Sorensen on August 31, 2007

Space station will be in view this weekend!

Be careful if you wish upon a star this weekend! The star you’re looking at just might be the international space station! The station will traverse the sky twice this holiday weekend. The first sighting will be possible Sunday morning at 5:43am and will last three minutes from the southern sky to the southeastern sky.

On Labor Day the ISS will be seen at 6:04am and will last for two minutes. Look in the southwest sky this time.

How will you know you are looking at the ISS? While shooting stars/meteors move fast across the sky, the ISS will be moving rather slow. Just find a fixed star and focus on that. Your eye will be attracted to the movement of the ISS.

Click here for ISS viewing times for other locations across the USA. -ERIC

Share

Posted under Uncategorized

This post was written by Eric Sorensen on August 30, 2007

On The Waterfront Forecast

If you are headed to On The Waterfront, this is your one stop shop for a nearly perfect forecast. Our rain chances will be near nil over the next four days. Cloud cover will be fairly minimal, so keep your sunscreen and sunglasses nearby. Those will be the constants. On the other hand, temperatures will be fluctuating a little bit. Thursday and Friday we will be sitting ahead of an area of high pressure. This will cause our winds to blow out of the north. These cool breezes will restrict our high temperatures from rising too much. Temperatures for Thursday and Friday will top out in the upper 70s. Once this area of high pressure slides into Michigan our winds will change to a southerly direction. This is known as a “return flow” and often causes a warming trend to begin. Temperatures for Saturday and Sunday will jump into the low to mid 80s. All in all, I think the next four days worth of weather are a reward for the soggy weather we’ve been enduring the past 3 weeks! -ADAM

Share

Posted under Uncategorized

This post was written by Eric Sorensen on August 30, 2007

Two years after Katrina

June 2007 Blog Post on Hurricane Katrina

I won’t ever forget the day Katrina came ashore. In fact, I remember showing the doppler radar on 13News as the eye came inland. The levees held for most of the day. But it wasn’t until the storm was ashore that the flooding in the Crescent City began. For nearly 2,000 people life ended on that day and in the days following.

I had the unfortunate (fortunate) responsibility of covering Hurricane Lili for KPLC-TV in 2002. Lili was a category five storm before it made landfall between Lake Charles and New Orleans. I spoke with a member of FEMA who said “If a major hurricane hits New Orleans and it floods, the fatalities will be in the thousands.” Unfortunately I didn’t think that his words would ring true just a few years later. (Honestly, I am done covering hurricanes as a Meteorologist. There’s something thrilling about chasing tornadoes and severe weather. Hurricanes are massive. For instance, I did one live shot from outside for three minutes and had every article of clothing wet. We don’t think about the fact that the rain and wind are more than 80°. Being in the path of a hurricane wasn’t such a nice thing.)

WWL-TV New Orleans has a great slide show with some very dramatic pictures of Katrina. Google has some satellite views of the Lower Ninth Ward. Unbelieveable to see how very little has changed.

What do you think went wrong with Katrina? Do you think it will happen again in our lifetime? -ERIC

Share

Posted under Uncategorized

This post was written by Eric Sorensen on August 30, 2007

Eclipse Pictures!


Check out these eclipse pictures from last night’s show! Thanks to Mike Stone, Meteorologist for WTOL-TV, for sending them into us. Mike, one just doesn’t look like the others however. ;-) -ERIC

Share

Posted under Uncategorized

This post was written by Eric Sorensen on August 28, 2007

Very Humid… Temporarily

That sticky feeling has returned across the Stateline. Dew points have climbed into the upper 60s and low 70s. This is creating a heat index or “feels like” temperature in the low to mid 90s. For folks that just can’t stand the oppressive humidity, you’ll be glad to hear that it will be exiting the region shortly. A cool front is set to slide across the region tomorrow. This will cause our temperatures to cool off, but the dew point drop will experience its usual 12 hour delay behind the front. Dew points will drop below the 60 degree mark by Wednesday night. -ADAM

Share

Posted under Uncategorized

This post was written by Eric Sorensen on August 28, 2007

Lunar Eclipse Tonight

(If you get any pictures of the lunar eclipse, please send them in then watch 13News!)

We will have a total eclipse of the moon during the early morning hours of Tuesday, August 28th.

The event is widely visible from the United States and Canada as well as South America, the Pacific Ocean, western Asia and Australia. During a total lunar eclipse, the Moon’s disk can take on a dramatically colorful appearance from bright orange to blood red to dark brown and (rarely) very dark gray.

An eclipse of the Moon can only take place at Full Moon, and only if the Moon passes through some portion of Earth’s shadow. The shadow is actually composed of two cone-shaped parts, one nested inside the other. The outer shadow or penumbra is a zone where Earth blocks some (but not all) of the Sun’s rays. In contrast, the inner shadow or umbra is a region where Earth blocks all direct sunlight from reaching the Moon.

If only part of the Moon passes through the umbra, a partial eclipse is seen. However, if the entire Moon passes through the umbral shadow, then a total eclipse of the Moon occurs.

Share

Posted under Uncategorized

This post was written by Eric Sorensen on August 27, 2007

Stray Storms

This morning at 5am I was watching a thunderstorm complex roll through Minneapolis and La Crosse, Wisconsin. It was moving straight east. Since then this cluster of activity has made a bit of a right hand turn. The core of the widespread rain is still sitting to the north of us in Madison, but a few thunderstorms have popped up on the tail end. These storms are moving to the east at 25 mph. We could see a few thunderstorms in the next couple of hours, which could produce brief downpours.

One thing that is working in our favor is that this complex is moving into a much drier atmosphere away from the greatest instability. They should slowly weaken as they continue to move east. -ADAM

Share

Posted under Uncategorized

This post was written by Eric Sorensen on August 27, 2007

A Drier Work Week

This next work week won’t be completely dry, but it will be drier than the last work week. The jet stream high up in the atmosphere acts as a pushing device for storm systems. Think of a cold front as a sail. If the sail is parallel to the wind it isn’t going to move much. That was the scenario this last work week when we saw showers and storms every day. A frontal boundary moved into the area and just sat there.

This next work week we will see less rain, because the storm system set to move in for Tuesday and Wednesday will be perpendicular to the jet stream. The “sail” will be able to pick up the driving wind making it a much quicker moving rainmaker. -ADAM

Share

Posted under Uncategorized

This post was written by Eric Sorensen on August 26, 2007