Alabama tornado photos

Courtesy: Fox 6 Birmingham

 

 

Cullman, Alabama (source: unknown)

Cullman, AL (source: unknown)

"Debris Ball" seen on doppler radar west of Birmingham, AL

 

 

Share

Posted under event, tornado

This post was written by qni_it on April 27, 2011

Tuscaloosa Tornado Video & Photo

This is an aftermath photo from Tuscaloosa, AL. -ES

Share

Posted under tornado

This post was written by qni_it on April 27, 2011

Knoxville, TN tornado coverage LIVE

9:25pm – I received this picture from Melanie Dewan. Her son is a student at the University of Tennessee and shot this picture of a true golf-ball sized hailstone. -ES

Large hail and tornadoes coming into Knoxville, TN. Coverage from WBIR-TV. Tornado near Rockford, Tennessee right now. Will skim the south side of Knoxville around 8pm CDT. -ES

Share

Posted under weather

This post was written by qni_it on April 27, 2011

Birmingham/Tuscaloosa, AL tornado coverage LIVE


Here is aftermath video from Tuscaloosa, AL:

 

Live coverage from ABC33/40 in Birmingham:

Streaming Video by Ustream.TV

Share

Posted under weather

This post was written by qni_it on April 27, 2011

Huntsville, AL tornado coverage LIVE

Live coverage from WHNT-TV.
 

Share

Posted under weather

This post was written by qni_it on April 27, 2011

Project Tornado: Question of the day

 Today’s Project Tornado question comes from Mrs. Martin’s class at Conklin Elementary School.

Question: Where was the first tornado spotted?

 Answers:

Story #1- Gov. John Winthrop was an avid writer and often wrote about the days weather in his journal. In July of 1643, he wrote of a “sudden gust” of wind that filled the air with dust and even killed one Indian. However, since this could have been a downdraft or a straight-line wind, it’s hard to say if it was actually a tornado or not.

Story #2- In Massachusetts in July of 1680, Rev. Mather wrote down his encounter as well as several other eyewitness reports of a terrible whirl-wind. This whirl-wind tore up trees, sucked in hay and damaged barns.

Share

Posted under weather geek

This post was written by qni_it on April 27, 2011

Wow! SPC forecasts high probabilities of…everything

There is a Tornado Watch for most of the state of Mississippi right now. When watches are issued by the Storm Prediction Center, there are given probabilities, slight, moderate, and high. This is the first watch I can recall that every hazard is categorized as “high.” -ES

Share

Posted under severe weather, tornado

This post was written by qni_it on April 27, 2011

How stuff works: Emergency alerts

If you have never checked out the website called “How Stuff Works”, you are missing out. I have been known to spend huge amounts of time there learning about well…how certain things around me work. I noticed an article about emergency alert systems that are in place or will soon be in place that mentions our 2008 tornado and thought I would share it with you all. Aside from this great read, feel free to check out the rest of this fascinating website!

How Emergency Alerts Work

 

-Aaron

Share

Posted under weather geek

This post was written by qni_it on April 27, 2011

Morning rain

While severe weather continues to rake the south today, rain showers will be found through late morning in northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin. An upper level front has formed from central Wisconsin through eastern Iowa and will slowly push east. In addition to this, two low pressure centers so our south and east continue to deepen which has combined with moisture to form rain.

Look for light to moderate showers with a rumble of thunder possible east of I-39 and south of the Illinois/Wisconsin border.

-Aaron

Share

Posted under First Look, rain

This post was written by qni_it on April 27, 2011

Forecast: Active, but late, severe weather season here

Our weather team joined those from other media outlets in Rockford for a special meeting with Meteorologists from the National Weather Service today. We discussed the prospects of severe weather in what has been a record month so far. Richard Castro, Intern at the Chicago office of the National Weather Service, put on a great slide show that showed the correlation between severe weather and La Niña (cooler than normal water in the Eastern Pacific). We remain in this pattern with a forecast of slow weakening. Still, it may take until June or July for La Niña to go away completely. Understanding this is important because some of the worst tornado outbreaks in Northern Illinois have occurred during La Niña, including 1967, when the area saw the worst tornadoes.

Recent outbreaks of tornadoes cause us to scratch our heads. Wisconsin saw an outbreak on April 10, 2011 with numerous tornadoes across Central and Northeastern parts of the state. The next significant outbreak happened in Raleigh, North Carolina with substantial damage to the city’s core along with many other locations in the Carolinas. Last Friday, St. Louis saw a direct hit by a tornado that significantly damaged the city’s airport. Last night, tornadoes were spawned near Hot Springs and Little Rock with up to ten fatalities (some due to flooding). And late today, significant tornadoes touched down in East Texas.

The question on everyone’s minds is what will become of this odd season. Typically, severe weather season begins along the Gulf Coast in February and moves into Texas in March and April. By May, it’s primetime for severe weather in the Plains from Oklahoma into Kansas and Nebraska. Typically, our worst weather occurs in early June. However in April 2011, there really isn’t a certain geographical area that has seen tornadoes. We expect that to change in the coming weeks.

Over the next week or two, the area shaded in yellow will be most at risk for severe thunderstorms as the jet stream dives south (and keeps us rather chilly). Areas that got hit tonight (like Texas) will have additional opportunities for severe weather. However, as time wears on this area will become increasingly capped (as temperatures build in the upper atmosphere). This will allow the jetstream and stormtrack to be oriented further north.

By the middle of May, I expect more frequent outbreaks of severe weather as far north as Northern Illinois. So while many of us have our guards down because it’s been so cool this spring, La Niña is still in place giving us a higher than normal chance for active severe weather. Will you be ready? -ES

Share

Posted under news, tornado

This post was written by qni_it on April 26, 2011