It All Depends on Which Way the Wind Blows

As we witnessed today across the Stateline region, the direction of the wind makes all the difference!  For most of the day, a warm front stalled out about 150 miles south of the area, causing our wind to come from the east.  That allowed the low clouds to stick around and kept temperatures in check by cool Lake Michigan.  Rockford just barely broke 50 degrees.  Readings were in the mid 50s south of the US Route 20 corridor and mid 40s in southern Wisconsin. 

A similar scenario is possible for Sunday.  The front that kept us cool today will move north overnight and allow our temperatures to rise and some patchy fog to form.  Scattered showers and thunderstorms are possible with the passing of this front late tonight and very early Sunday morning.  By tomorrow afternoon, the sky will turn partly cloudy, helping temperatures rise above average.  However, with the frontal boundary becoming nearly stationary and stalling across the area, afternoon high temperatures will be tricky to forecast. 

Locations in southern Wisconsin such as Janesville, Milton, Delavan, Lake Geneva and parts of Illinois closer to Lake Michigan (including McHenry County) may see their wind shift from southeasterly to easterly early on, so afternoon high temperatures may only rise into the middle 60s.  Milwaukee and downtown Chicago will struggle to climb into the 50s.

On the other hand, areas south and west of Rockford like Milledgeville, Dixon, Amboy, and Mendota will climb nicely into the mid and upper 70s thanks to a persistent southeast wind. 

For the Rockford metro, Freeport, Oregon, and Rochelle, temperatures will likely reach the low 70s by afternoon.  During the evening, the wind will shift easterly and allow temperatures to tumble a few degrees.

All of this depends on where the frontal boundary sets up shop!  If it stalls out 50 miles further north or south, afternoon high temperatures will be drastically different.

-JA

Share

Posted under weather

This post was written by qni_it on March 31, 2012

Leave a Comment

Name (required)

Email (required)

Website

Comments

 

More Blog Post