Be careful with roof repair requests!

scammersJust today, I received a call from a family who lives in Ogle County, Illinois. Within a few hours of the hail storm that affected their home someone called wanting to know if the home had been affected by hail and if it did damage. The family told me they did have hail but never solicited the phone call from the person wanting information. Luckily for them, they didn’t answer questions, ended the phone call, and e-mailed us.

It’s a great idea to inspect your home (or have it inspected) after you receive big hail. But be very careful if someone contacts you about damage to your home. And follow these simple, basic rules if you think you may need some repairs:

Each roofer should be able to provide the names and addresses of three previous clients.
Red flag: If a roofing contractor is offering to pay an insurance deductible.
Red flag: If a contractor is offering a no cost incentive to the home owner.

Insist on a written contract before work is performed and request a detailed, written estimate as well. Check with three previous clients and ask them about their experience. Never pay with cash. Don’t pay more than 10 percent of the job’s total as a down payment. Be wary if your roofer bids low on the estimate but requires a hefty down payment. Roofing scammers will take your money and run.

Schedule the work for a time that’s convenient for you. Schedule payments so you don’t have to pay up front. Reputable companies don’t need money to buy supplies. Pay in increments as the work is completed and get receipts. If possible, pay down payment charges by credit card. That way charges can be disputed. And never pay in full until the job is complete.

Only employ a licensed roofing contractor. Make sure he/she gets the proper permits. They will protect the resale of your home and are required by lending institutions. Permits add value to your project and require that inspections be performed to verify that work was done correctly.

Never let anyone into your home. Watch all inspections. Scammers will use a ball-peen hammer to cause damage to persuade you of a bigger problem.

Side note: Any of these tips doesn’t necessarily mean there are ill-intentions, nor should this advice be considered legal advice. It’s always best to ask questions, get second opinions, and contact the Better Business Bureau before and after a big job. Be careful!

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Posted under weather

This post was written by qni_it on May 21, 2014

How to program your new Midland Weather Radio

Our next weather radio event will be held a week from now (next Thursday) in Roscoe/Rockton. In the meantime, if you buy a Midland Weather Radio, they are pretty easy to program. Use this video to program your own. NOTE: There are some Midland Weather Radios that are programmed using SAME codes instead of county name. Click here to find the six-digit code that corresponds to the county you live in.

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Posted under weather

This post was written by qni_it on May 21, 2014

Streaming Coverage

Watch our coverage live here:

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Posted under weather

This post was written by qni_it on May 20, 2014

Severe Thunderstorm Warnings & Reports

(7:59 PM) nwsbot:DVN issues Severe Thunderstorm Warning [wind: 60 MPH, hail: 1.75 IN] for Jackson [IA] and Carroll [IL] till 9:00 PM CDT
(7:23 PM) nwsbot:LOT issues Severe Thunderstorm Warning [wind: <50 MPH, hail: 1.00 IN] for Lake, McHenry [IL] till 8:15 PM CDT

7:23pm – Very large hail is falling in DeKalb and Kane Co. right now. Byron Downen reports via Twitter that there is large hail and that traffic is not moving on I-88. In addition, high wind is being noted on doppler on the order of 55-60mph. Very dangerous storm! radar

(7:14 PM) nwsbot:LOT issues Severe Thunderstorm Warning [wind: 60 MPH, hail: 1.75 IN] for De Kalb, Kane, Kendall [IL] till 8:00 PM CDT

Here is a look at Hailvision. Areas in white/red show most intense hail. Regions outlined in yellow are where active Severe Thunderstorm Warnings are right now. radar7:00pm – Golf ball sized hail reported in DeKalb.

6:48pm – Golf ball sized hail reported in Rochelle past 10 minutes.

(6:46 PM) nwsbot:LOT continues Severe Thunderstorm Warning [wind: 60 MPH, hail: 1.50 IN] for De Kalb, Kane, Ogle [IL] till 7:15 PM CDT

(6:34 PM) nwsbot:LOT issues Severe Thunderstorm Warning [wind: 60 MPH, hail: 1.25 IN] for Winnebago [IL] till 7:15 PM CDT

(6:33 PM) nwsbot:LOT issues Severe Thunderstorm Warning [wind: 60 MPH, hail: 1.50 IN] for De Kalb, Kane, Ogle [IL] till 7:15 PM CDT

(6:30 PM) nwsbot:Local Storm Report by NWS DVN: N Dakota [Stephenson Co, IL] trained spotter reports HAIL of pea size (M0.25 INCH) at 06:30 PM CDT —

(6:23 PM) nwsbot:DVN issues Severe Thunderstorm Warning [wind: <50 MPH, hail: 1.00 IN] for Stephenson [IL] till 7:00 PM CDT

(6:18 PM) nwsbot:Local Storm Report by NWS LOT: 2 SSE Oregon [Ogle Co, IL] public reports HAIL of penny size (E0.75 INCH) at 06:12 PM CDT — jelly bean sized and shaped

(6:18 PM) nwsbot:Local Storm Report by NWS DVN: 3 NNE Stockton [Jo Daviess Co, IL] co-op observer reports HAIL of penny size (E0.75 INCH) at 05:30 PM CDT —

(6:04 PM) nwsbot:LOT issues Severe Thunderstorm Warning [wind: 60 MPH, hail: 1.00 IN] for Ogle [IL] till 7:00 PM CDT

(5:35 PM) nwsbot:Local Storm Report by NWS DVN: 3 NNE Stockton [Scott Co, IA] co-op observer reports HAIL of penny size (E0.75 INCH) at 05:30 PM CDT —

(5:35 PM) nwsbot:Local Storm Report by NWS DVN: Galena [Jo Daviess Co, IL] public reports HAIL of quarter size (M1.00 INCH) at 05:30 PM CDT — report via facebook.

(5:34 PM) nwsbot:DVN issues Severe Thunderstorm Warning [wind: 60 MPH, hail: 1.00 IN] for Jo Daviess, Stephenson [IL] till 6:15 PM CDT

(5:34 PM) nwsbot:Local Storm Report by NWS DVN: ESE Warren [Jo Daviess Co, IL] trained spotter reports HAIL of quarter size (M1.00 INCH) at 05:28 PM CDT — dime to quarters.

5:30pm – Watching thunderstorms popping up in just a few scans of Doppler to the southwest of Oregon. The atmosphere will allow these to rapidly develop, possibly reaching the Rockford Metro will hail by 6:30pm. Monitoring…

radarVery large hail crossing Mississippi River as of 5:20. Severe Thunderstorm Warning continue for Jo Daviess Co. through 6pm.

(5:05 PM) nwsbot:DVN issues Severe Thunderstorm Warning [wind: 60 MPH, hail: 1.75 IN] for Dubuque, Jackson [IA] and Jo Daviess [IL] till 6:00 PM CDT

(4:57 PM) nwsbot:Local Storm Report by NWS DVN: 1 E Dubuque Regional Ai [Dubuque Co, IA] emergency mngr reports HAIL of ping pong ball size (M1.50 INCH) at 04:50 PM CDT —

(4:19 PM) nwsbot:DVN issues Severe Thunderstorm Warning [wind: 60 MPH, hail: 1.00 IN] for Dubuque, Jackson [IA] and Jo Daviess [IL] till 5:15 PM CDT

Severe Thunderstorm Watch in effect for Northern Illinois and Southern Wisconsin until 11pm tonight. http://www.spc.noaa.gov/products/watch/ww0161.html

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Posted under weather

This post was written by qni_it on May 20, 2014

Strong Storms Possible

We have spent most of the day with clear skies and warm temperatures! Can you feel the humidity? A very warm and moist atmosphere will be primed for the potential for strong storms late this afternoon into this evening. severeIsolated thunderstorms are definitely in the cards and thanks to the abundant moisture and a good amount of wind shear expected, a few of those storms will have the capability of producing large hail and damaging wind. Enough rotation for the development for a tornado can’t be ruled out either. hailThere is nothing on radar yet, but we will have our eyes glued to the incoming system off to our west. Stay tuned here as well as on our Facebook page for more updates! – Greg

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Posted under heat wave, severe weather

This post was written by qni_it on May 20, 2014

Onward & Upward

Good news! Our temperature trend is moving in the positive direction again. The next seven days will see high temperatures much closer to average. The middle of May has an average high in the lower 70s, not the 50s like we’ve witnessed the past week.

The Week Ahead

The Week Ahead

Sunday will be mostly sunny, mild and pleasant. High temperatures will rise into the upper 60s. Sunday, however, will be the coolest day of the week!

FutureTrack: Sunday afternoon

FutureTrack: Upper 60s on Sunday

An area of high pressure will drift east through the Ohio Valley. Since air moves clockwise around an area of high pressure, we will notice a wind direction with a southerly component. A southerly wind will help warm things up!

Warmer Winds

Warmer Winds

Monday will be very similar to Sunday, in terms of temperature. By mid-week, temperatures will rise well into the 70s and make a run for 80 in a few spots.

FutureTrack: Pushing 70 on Monday

FutureTrack: Pushing 70 on Monday

We will have to watch out for a few isolated shower and thunderstorm chances this week, mainly on Monday night, Tuesday and next Saturday.

-Joe

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Posted under FutureTrack, weather

This post was written by qni_it on May 17, 2014

Clouds Keeping Us Cool

We have entered into a cool stretch that will be giving us three straight days with high temps in the 50s. That means our highs will be some 15-20 degrees below average. Not to mention, the next two nights will drop all the way into the upper 30s. Just for a quick reality check, our average high temp over the next three days is 72° – GregCapture

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Posted under cold blast, statistics

This post was written by qni_it on May 15, 2014

Looking Back

Yesterday’s storms are well off to the east and we have entered a much calmer (and cooler) weather pattern. In just the matter of 24 hours, some of our hometowns received almost 3″ of rainfall! Places that were the bullseye for our biggest storms yesterday even had some flash flooding this morning, but conditions have improved greatly as we have gone through the day. radarBe prepared for cooler temperatures for the rest of the week as highs struggle to stay in the 60s today through Friday. – Greg

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Posted under event, rain, weather

This post was written by qni_it on May 13, 2014

Severe Thunderstorm Watch

brn

5:45pm Update – Here’s a look at a graphic we use frequently during severe weather events. This is the Bulk Richardson Number map or BRN. It is a proxy that utilizes the amount of instability and shear. Both are needed to sustained thunderstorms, and in this case severe weather. BRN between 15 and 75 are the sweet spot we look for when it comes to severe thunderstorms. Notice how the storms in Southern Wisconsin are in that BRN zone favorable for severe weather. The line in Eastern Iowa as it enters Northwestern Illinois will be in a very favorable area for development and sustainability. However, the storms in Missouri are exiting the BRN zone and will likely weaken. radarA Severe Thunderstorm Watch is in effect for our entire coverage area through 11pm tonight. Be on the lookout for severe thunderstorms including large hail and damaging straight-line wind. Remember, severe thunderstorms occasionally produce tornadoes as well. Watch live coverage all evening long here:

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Posted under weather

This post was written by qni_it on May 12, 2014

Don’t get kicked by a “rain foot”

rainfoot3Thank you to Ashley Jordan for this stunning photo from Leaf River on Sunday. What looks like a normal rain shower is actually evidence of a wet microburst! What’s abnormal with this photo is the presence of a “rain foot.” A rain foot is where the rain shaft (which is normally at an 80-90° angle to the ground) actually bends into the horizontal. The photo to the left is the unedited version she shared on Facebook. But let’s analyze the photo to learn what’s going on here.

Look closely at the base of the cloud and you can see the opening where hail and heavy rain is falling. The rain shaft also shows us where the heavy precipitation is occurring. Yesterday’s storms produced quite a bit of hail at their mature stages and this one probably did produce at least pea-sized hail.

RAINFOOT2

 

Now look closely at the leading edge of the rain shaft. See how it juts out along the ground to the right? That’s a rain foot. A rain foot gives us visual evidence of a wet microburst, a very strong wind pushing down and out ahead of the thunderstorm. Most times, it’s hard to see a rain foot head on. If you drive into one from the front, you’ll be buffeted by very strong horizontal wind with pelting rain. But this photo from Ashley shows the rain foot at a perfect angle.

I’m interested to know if anybody saw any damage with this rain foot near the Leaf River area Sunday. If so, pass the information along to us!

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Posted under weather geek

This post was written by qni_it on May 12, 2014